The foundation

Board & Staff

Board Members

  • Bob Liljestrand Associate AIA, President

    Bob Liljestrand has had a life long interest in architecture sparked from his family’s engagement with architect Vladimir Ossipoff, designer of the Liljestrand House in the early 1950s. As the president of the Liljestrand Foundation, Bob is leading it through a time of growth and transition, while completing a book on the development and history of the House.

    Born and raised in Hawai‘i, Bob is an active member in Oahu’s civic life and is deeply involved in the architecture and design community. He serves as a board member of the Hawai‘i Architectural Foundation and a member of the Advisory Council to the School of Architecture, University of Hawai‘i. He was a former five-term president and is a current board member at the Adventurers’ Club of Honolulu.

    Bob has lectured extensively on the Liljestrand House and Vladimir Ossipoff’s collaboration with his family at such institutions as the Pacific Club, the University of Hawai‘i, AIA Headquarters in New York City, and the German Museum of Architecture in Frankfurt. He also enjoys giving adventure talks at multiple events, including a gala hosted by the Los Angeles Adventurers’ Club at the Ambassador Hotel’s Cocoanut Grove Night Club.

    In addition to his interest in architecture, Bob is an accomplished photographer and filmmaker. He produced three documentaries that were featured in a variety of film festivals, including the Hawai‘i International Film Festival, American Film Institute Festival Los Angeles (formerly known as the Los Angeles International Film Festival) and the Chicago Festival, where his film Moloka’i Solo won a Gold Plaque. His photography has been featured in a number of one-man gallery exhibitions and was published in the Los Angeles Times Sunday Supplement. One of his works was nominated for a Na Hoku Hano Hano Award (Hawai‘i’s Grammy Awards) for a Kapono Beamer CD cover.

    Prior to devoting his time to the Liljestrand Foundation, Bob worked as a hospital administrator at the Leeward Hospital and Clinic and as a designer and draftsman for a Honolulu architect. In addition to serving as the Liljestrand Foundation President, Bob oversees the family’s real estate business.

    Bob holds a Bachelor of Arts in Biology from California State University at San Jose, a Master in Public Health from the University of Hawaii, and a Master in Architecture from the University of New Mexico.

  • Vicky Durand Liljestrand, Vice President

    As a Board member of the Liljestrand Foundation, Vicky Durand Liljestrand has been deeply involved in its transformation and growth over the past
    ten years.

    Vicky graduated from Punahou High School and spent her formative years in Hawaii as a young surfer. In 1957, she won The Makaha International Surfing Championships, an early surfing contest.  Along with her mother, who was also an accomplished surfer, Vicky was invited to Club Waikiki in Lima, Peru as mother-daughter Hawaiian surfing ambassadors.

    Her interest in fashion led her to establish a sportswear and textile design company that she directed for a number of years. Based in California and Hawaii, the company’s products were distributed by boutiques, department stores and museum shops across the country.

    Vicky also taught for many years at a Title I School in Waianae, Hawaii. While teaching, she collaborated actively with community groups to provide better education and services for her students. In addition, she successfully pursued grant funding to start an early education and childcare facility for teen parents to enable them to finish school and graduate.  Head Start later took over the childcare center and Vicky collaborated and worked closely with the staff.

    While serving as a Foundation Board member, Vicky also manages family property in Hawaii. She is the mother of two grown daughters, an avid gardener and is passionately involved in animal rescue, working with cats and dogs.

    Vicky received her AA from the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles and BS at California State University Long Beach in Family and Consumer Science, both with a focus on apparel manufacture and fashion design. She holds an MS from Oregon State University in Clothing and Textiles with a minor in Adult Education. Vicky
    is certified in Secondary teaching and Special Education.

  • William Chapman

    Board member William (Bill) Chapman is lifelong historic preservationist with a passion for old houses. With widespread experience in the US, Asia, and the Pacific, he is director of the Graduate Program in Historic Preservation, professor in and chair of the Department of American Studies, and interim dean of the School of Architecture at the University of
    Hawai’i at Manoa.

    A four-time Fulbright scholar and American Candidate at the International Center for Study of the Preservation and Restoration of Cultural Property in Rome (ICCROM), Bill has traveled extensively throughout Southeast Asia and has served as a lecturer at Silpakorn, Kasetsart, and Chulalongkorn Universities in Thailand and at the Royal University of Fine Arts in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

    Bill is a frequent contributor to UNESCO projects and is a member of the ICOMOS (International Council on Monuments and Sites) International Scientific Committees on the Theory and Philosophy of Conservation and Restoration and on Vernacular Architecture.

    Widely published in scholarly journals, he has also written on subjects ranging from the historic Volcano House Hotel in Hawai‘i to the Wright Brothers National Memorial at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. His most recent publication is Ancient Sites of Southeast Asia: A Traveler’s Guide through History, Ruins, and Landscapes (Bangkok: River Books, 2017).

    Bill serves on the Hawai’i Historic Sites Review Board and plays an active role in historic preservation in the state. In 2011, he received the Frank Haines Award for Lifetime Contributions to Historic Preservation from the Historic Hawai‘i Foundation. He has also served on the board of the Historic Hawai‘i Foundation. In 2016, he was elected a Fellow of the Explorers Club of New York in recognition of his many projects abroad.

    Bill was educated at Columbia (M.S. in Historic Preservation, 1978) and at Oxford University in England (D.Phil.in Anthropology, 1982). He specializes in architectural recording, the history of historic preservation, and materials conservation. He was also a contributing author to the Hawai’i Modernism Context Study assembled by Fung and Associates (2011) in conjunction with Historic Hawaii Foundation and the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

    He is married to Phensinee Rueangpruek Chapman and is the father of
    two daughters and two stepchildren. He lives in Honolulu and part-time
    in Bangkok.

  • Jack Gillmar

    Board member Jack Gillmar’s appreciation for historic houses stems from growing up in Alfred Preis’ first residential design (1939) built in the center of Waikiki. Preis was one of Hawaii’s leading architects who worked collaboratively with Ossipoff on a number of projects. He was also a founder of the Hawai’i State Foundation on Culture and the Arts. Jack’s early years in his Preis designed home had a profound effect on him and led to his enthusiastic support of Liljestrand House and of architectural preservation in general. Jack is a member of the Hawai’i chapter of Docomomo, the international organization headquartered in Europe and devoted to the DOcumentation and COnservation of the MOdern MOvement.

    Jack has undertaken a number of historic site restorations, including the interior of his Alfred Preis home and a partial restoration of the historic David Adler designed La Pietra (1920), now the Hawaii School for Girls, that borders Kapiolani Park at Diamond Head.  President of the Kapiolani Park Preservation Society for four years, Jack continues to serve as a Board advisor.

    When his childhood home designed by Preis was threatened by high-rise development pressures in Waikiki, Jack and his wife, Janet, moved the structure to a quiet mountain setting.  Janet designed a new architectural envelope, while the interior design elements of the original house
    were saved.

    Jack is currently engaged with three associates in producing a book on the life and work of Alfred Preis.

    In addition to his interest in historic homes, Jack is dedicated to preserving Hawaiian heritage. Jack and Janet established the Friendship Garden Foundation in 1978 to preserve and maintain the Friendship Garden (1928), a ten-acre National Historic Site in Kaneohe, Oahu. The Garden was originally the recreational component of the nation’s first intentional inter-racial subdivision. Jack also serves on the board of Manoa Heritage Center, where he helps further the Center’s mission to promote the thoughtful stewardship of the natural and cultural heritage of Hawaii.

    Prior to his work in preservation, Jack and Janet served as Peace Corps volunteers on Pohnpei Island in Micronesia.  He also taught history for 30 years at La Pietra School.  For ten years Jack served as Chairman of the Parker School Trust on the Island of Hawaii.

    Jack holds a BA from the University of Pennsylvania, an MA in
    Counseling Psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute and an MAT from Harvard University.

  • Dean Sakamoto FAIA, NCARB, LEED AP

    Advisory Board member Dean Sakamoto is a practicing architect and educator with a national presence and diverse local expertise. He is the founder and director of SHADE, a collaborative design practice and a non-profit professional training and community service institute. In 2014 he was appointed by Governor Neil Abercrombie to serve on the Board of Commissioners of the Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts.

    As a licensed architect in the states of Connecticut and Hawaii, Dean holds certificates from the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED AP) from the U.S. Green Building Council. In 2010, he was elevated to fellowship by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) for his nationwide contribution to architectural education. He currently serves on the AIA National Advisory Committee on Resilience.

    His Honolulu, Hawaii and New Haven, Connecticut-based firm, Dean Sakamoto Architects/SHADE group (DSA) is known for its environmentally sensitive and culturally specific designs of buildings and places. DSA’s projects include the Juliet Rice Wichman Botanical Research Center in Hawaii, which received an AIA Honolulu Award of Excellence in 2010. At Yale University DSA restored and transformed the historic Graves House at 51 Hillhouse Avenue, a five story civil-war-era mansion (b.1860), into a 21st century archaeology lab and teaching center for the Department of Anthropology (2010).

    Since 1993, Dean served on the university faculties of Yale University School of Architecture and School of Forestry and Environmental Studies; University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Architecture and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning; Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York; and Chaminade University of Honolulu, Institute of Fine Arts.

    At Yale, Dean was a critic in design, teaching graduate and undergraduate courses, and served as the director of exhibitions at the Yale Architecture Gallery, where he was responsible for the professionalization of its programs. His scholarly work includes the award-winning book and the international traveling exhibition, Hawaiian Modern: The Architecture of Vladimir Ossipoff, organized by the Honolulu Museum of Art and curated by Dean. The Hawaiian Modern book is now in its third printing (Yale University Press in association with the Honolulu Museum of Art, 2007).

    Dean holds a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Oregon, Master of Architecture from the Cranbrook Academy of Art, and a Master of Environmental Design from Yale University.

Advisory Board

  • Keira Alexandra

    Advisory Board member Keira Alexandra is the co-founder of Work-Order, a New York-based studio specializing in brand, strategy and motion design. Several of Work-Order’s projects, including logos and branding systems for Kodak, Now This and The New York Times, have appeared on “best of” lists.

    Keira began her graphic design career by working at some of New York’s most notable design firms including M&Co., Bureau, and Number 17. She then became art director of on-air design at MTV, creating numerous network rebrands, and creative director of Sundance TV, where she worked with Al Franken, Robert Altman and other independent film directors.

    Keira lectures frequently about design and has taught graphic design in the graduate program at Yale since 1999. From 2008 to 2010, she served on the board of the American Institute of Graphic Arts New York, a national non-profit that serves design professionals.

    Her homes have been featured on the covers of Metropolis and Dwell Magazines.

    Keira graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1990 with a BFA. She is the daughter of Alexandra Ossipoff and spent her childhood summers at the residence of her grandparents, Raelyn and Vladimir Ossipoff, in Kuliouou, Hawaii.

  • Brian Lam

    Advisory Board member Brian Lam is a journalist and entrepreneur who has written for a number of noted publications including The New Yorker, The New York Times, and Wired Magazine, where he also served as an editor. For five years Brian served as editor-in-chief of the technology site Gizmodo where he pioneered a modern rebellious brand of journalism drawing from the style of Hunter S. Thompson.  His work at Gizmodo led to negotiations with Steve Jobs over the return of a lost prototype iPhone, and banishment from the world’s largest and most prestigious technology conferences.

    In 2011 Brian founded The Wirecutter, a web publication dedicated to research-based recommendations for its readers about the best gear and technology to purchase. Wirecutter was bootstrapped and built over five years with no outside fundraising. In late 2016 The New York Times acquired The Wirecutter. It was the first time in its 164-year history that the paper acquired a company because that company could produce a product the quality of which the paper could not match or surpass.

    Brian documented the Aquarius undersea research labs in the Florida Keys, worked with IMAX film crews in Indonesia, and with the help of robot submarines searched for lost gold in flooded northern California mines.

    Brian worked for five years in a boxing gym in San Francisco before moving to Honolulu, where he surfs and spends his time restoring and caring for an historic home built by Albert Ives, another noted Hawaii architect, with a pool house designed by Vladimir Ossipoff.

  • Wei Fang

    Advisory Board member Wei Fang is the founder and director of Interisland Terminal, an organization that presents contemporary art, design and film and explores the intersection of creativity, innovation and civic engagement in Hawai‘i.

    Wei began her career as a museum educator, working at the Harvard Art Museums, the de Young Museum in San Francisco, and the Contemporary Museum in Honolulu, now the Honolulu Museum of Art - Spalding House. At each institution, she served on planning teams for major museum construction and expansion projects—each intended to better integrate the museums with their audience communities.  From this, she developed a passion for architecture and mission-driven building projects.

    After completing her MBA, Wei moved to London to manage an expansion project for the auction house Phillips de Pury and Co. Architecture and Design was a focus of the company, which organized ground-breaking collaborations with contemporary architects such as Zaha Hadid and Shigeru Ban.  After returning to Honolulu in 2010, Wei helped found the non-profit Interisland Terminal, a place-making organization. Working with Kamehameha Schools and several local architects, she helped establish the art and design bookshop, a coffee bar, the gallery R&D, and the event space, Kaka’ako Agora. During this time, Interisland Terminal also partnered with the Liljestrand Foundation, Historic Hawaii Foundation, AIGA Honolulu, and Docomomo Hawaii on diverse public education programs.

    In addition to Interisland Terminal, Wei currently focuses her attention on boutique, design-driven, infill projects in Honolulu’s urban core.  Her current residential project, Hau‘oli Lofts, is a 9-unit condo currently under-construction in the McCully neighborhood. She also serves on the board of the Hawaii Community Development Agency, which oversees master planning, stewardship and development of Kaka‘ako, Kalaeloa and He‘eia.

    Wei has a BA from Brown University, a Masters in Education from Harvard University, and an MBA from Columbia University.

  • Joe Ferraro FAIA

    Advisory Board member Joe Ferraro is a principal and co-founder of Ferraro Choi and Associates, Ltd., an environmentally oriented architectural, interior design and research firm located in Honolulu, Hawaii. He is professionally licensed in Hawaii and New York.

    Joe achieved recognition as a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 2008 for his significant contributions to environmentally sustainable professional practice. He presently serves on a number of boards including the Hawaii Architectural Foundation, a non-profit organization advancing knowledge of architecture in the community, and the Rotary Club of Honolulu Sunrise. He also serves as an adjunct instructor for the University of Hawaii’s doctoral degree practicum program. Joe is an advisor to the University of Hawaii’s Sea Grant College Program and advisor to the board of Malama Manoa, a local community-based organization.

    He has been a panelist and speaker at numerous professional and public venues including the Environmental Protection Agency’s “Laboratories for the 21st Century”, the Adventurers’ Club, The Antarctican Society, the University of Hawaii’s Sea Grant Ascent Symposium, and the Urban Land Institute.

    Joe is the author of several papers on planning and sustainable design for research facilities in the Antarctic. His 30 years of work in the region includes the design of the Crary Science and Technology Laboratory and the Information Technology and Communication Center at McMurdo Station, Ross Island as well as the Amundsen-Scott Research Station at the geographic South Pole. In 1985 he was the recipient of the Antarctic Service Medal from the United States Congress for his committed work in the Antarctic for the National Science Foundation.

    He was the principal in charge for the University of Hawaii at Manoa’s new Information Technology Center and a collaborative principal with HOK San Francisco for the design of the new NOAA I Inouye Regional Center on Ford Island. He continues his design practice throughout Hawaii, the Pacific and in Antarctica as a principal in charge of the firm’s work. Joe’s office is located in the historic IBM Building, a building designed by Vladimir Ossipoff and certified LEED CI Platinum in August of 2011.

    Joe received his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Pratt Institute. He worked in New York City for eleven years before moving to Hawaii in 1982, where he attended the University of Hawaii School of Architecture for undergraduate and graduate studies.

Staff

For information on Friends of Liljestrand and other ways to support the Foundation:

Kristi Cardoso
Assistant Director
kristi [at] liljestrandfoundation.org

 
For information on tours, events, facility rentals and media inquiries:

Trudy Couillard
Facilities & Events Manager
trudy [at] liljestrandfoundation.org

 

Buff Kavelman
Philanthropic Advisor


Emily G.A. Moody

Web & Print Designer

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